Bad fruit from bad theology…


Well, this is pretty depressing…

The study, based on data from the 2007 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, uncovered that belief in the “Second Coming” of Jesus reduced the probability of strongly supporting government action on climate change by 12 percent when controlling for a number of demographic and cultural factors. When the effects of party affiliation, political ideology, and media distrust were removed from the analysis, the belief in the “Second Coming” increased this effect by almost 20 percent.

“[I]t stands to reason that most nonbelievers would support preserving the Earth for future generations, but that end-times believers would rationally perceive such efforts to be ultimately futile, and hence ill-advised,” Barker and Bearce explained.

Look, people.

Death is inevitable.

But we don’t stop working, eating, drinking water, showering, clothing, and generally trying to take care of ourselves because we’re eventually going to die.

Nor do we sell our houses, run out and spend everything we own when we hit 69, because we want to leave something behind for our kids and grandkids.

Sweet fracking Buddha, people, how much more should we try to leave the kids a habitable planet instead of a blasted toxic hell zone?

Could we maybe try to admit that we’re not God? Maybe admit that despite what your pastor tells you, we might not be living in the End Days (like the 2,000 years of Christians before us), that we don’t know when God will show up, and therefore that we should take care of the place God’s given us like it’s going to last another 6 billion years?

And finally, maybe, could we try and agree that it’s not our job to bring about the End of Days or live in some nihilistic state of mind that prevents us from doing good?

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One thought on “Bad fruit from bad theology…

  1. Pingback: Denial of Climate Chance Science and Bad Eschatology are Related | Unsettled Christianity

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